Public Programme

RECLAIMING THE CURATORIAL 2017

A WORKSHOP EXPLORING EXPANDED CURATORIAL PRACTICES

11-14 APRIL, CUBITT GALLERY & STUDIO 5 

 

 

Following the 2015 edition, Reclaiming the Curatorial returns as an intensive, practical course for individuals interested in developing self-organised platforms for curating and presenting contemporary visual art practice.  Based at Cubitt Gallery and Studios, a leading artist-led organisation renowned for its Curatorial Fellowship, this springtime school will consist of workshops and seminars led by invited artists & curators, alongside visits to some of London’s inspiring peer-led and self-initiated projects.

In the past ten years curating courses have tended to focus on institutional contexts, whilst a rich activity of curatorial practices led by artists and creative practitioners has been producing exhibitions, setting up spaces, and experimenting with new collaborative working methods.  The creative arts are also facing significant financial challenges, and urgently need new models for producing and sharing contemporary practice.

The course is designed for artists, emerging curators, students/recent graduates and other creative professionals interested in developing self-initiated, peer-led and alternative forms of curating practice.  Themes will include: research, commissioning, production and dissemination. Reclaiming the Curatorial offers a small group of participants the chance to take part in a focused study: developing skills in self-organised practice; alongside learning directly from inspiring individuals and collectives, the workshop is a chance to meet other like-minded people interested in developing expanded curatorial practices and sharing working methods.

 

Programme

Day 1: Public Research, 10am – 6pm

Day 1 begins with an introduction to the themes of the workshop, raising questions around the development of self-organised and expanded curatorial practices. Dereck Harris, one of Cubitt’s founding members will introduce the artist-run organisation and cooperative model and the different paths it has taken and challenges it has faced over the years. The day continues with a presentation from Noor Afshan introducing her organisation No.w.here and discussing the evolvement of the artist-led platform and new forms of instution making from an intersectional perspective. In the afternoon, artist Lucy Parker will present her project Blacklist, a long-term research into the experiences of blacklisted construction workers which feeds into the production of a film, alongside a workshop delving into the ethics and politics of collaborative working.

Day 2: Collective Production, 10am – 6pm

Day 2 focuses on ideas of collective production beginning with an offsite presentation and workshop by The Showroom curator Louise Shelley. Louise will focus on the work she has developed within the programme Communal Knowledge – a series of collaborative projects with local and international artists to propose and activate approaches to critical engagement with The Showroom’s social and cultural surroundings. The afternoon concludes with a presentation by Irene Revell, Artistic Director of Electra (2011-15) who will discuss feminist approaches to curatorial working.

Day 3: Expanded Exhibitions, 10am – 6pm

The third day explores methods of expanding the exhibition beyond the gallery, through publications, radio and other platforms. Artist Ghislaine Leung shares her approach to making work through its distributive context through her recent projects Hollis & Money – an evening of video and readings at the ICA and The Moves a solo exhibition at Cell Project Space. This is followed by an afternoon workshop with Radio Anti – a temporary online and FM radio station. Together, we will produce a broadcast reflecting on different processes and avenues for distributing work.

Day 4: Onwards, 10am – 1.30pm

The final day features a presentation from Cubitt’s new Curatorial Fellow Helen Nisbet who will share her ideas and curatorial methodology for her upcoming exhibition programme. This will explore the potentials of working collaboratively as well as forging multi-disciplinary collaborations, rooted in research, friendship or shared experiences. The programme will have an attentiveness to class, gender and social justice and also explore the potential of working rurally and regionally. The workshop concludes with a final group discussion sharing ideas for future working.

Each day will also include a final session in which you can present and discuss your own work with each other or share a problem or challenge you are working through in your practice.

 

Cubitt is a nonprofit organisation; the participation fee helps cover costs of producing this workshop
LIMITED TICKETS! £120.00/£90.00 student concessions
A limited number of unwaged concessions is available at £30.00

 

Contributors

Dereck Harris is a painter and one of the Cubitt Artists founding members; he has been involved in the running of the organisation for the past 25 years.  He has exhibited regularly since participating in the 1982 New Contemporaries exhibition at the ICA. He was the Course Leader of BA Fine Art: Painting at UAL Wimbledon College of Art from 2004 – 2016 and Course Director from 2009 – 2011; he continues to teach at Wimbledon as an Associate Lecturer. Dereck has exhibited and curated exhibitions in London and Berlin and also exhibits his teaching research  (pedagogical activity)  within the UAL Community of Practice Feral Space, most recently in the Practices of Enquiry exhibition at the UAL Showroom Gallery, 2017.

Noor Afshan‘s multi-layered practice consists of filmmaking, drawing, installation, performance and curating. Her work challenges terms such as participation, collaboration, the social turn and the traditional roles of the artist as producer and the audience as recipient.   Since 2007, Afshan and Brad Butler have been developing a body of work entitled the Museum of non Participation. Recent exhibitions include The New Deal at the Walker Art Centre (April – July 2013), Performa 13 (2013) and Derin Devlet (Deep State) at Galeri NON (Jan – Feb 2014). The Museum of non Participation was nominated for the Artes Mundi Award 2014 for visual artists who engage with the human condition, social reality and lived experience.  In 2004, they formed no.w.here, an artist-run organisation that combines film production with critical dialogue about contemporary image making.

Lucy Parker is an artist filmmaker living in London and Senior Lecturer in Filmmaking at Kingston University. Her ongoing research project, Blacklist – currently in production – looks at the practice of political blacklisting of workers in the UK. Lucy was the 2016 filmmaker in residence at the Berwick Film and Media Arts Festival; her films have been screened at locations in the UK including the Jerwood Space and the ICA, London; Rhubaba, Edinburgh, and internationally at Rotterdam Film Festival; Images Festival, Toronto, and Copenhagen Short Film Festival.

Louise Shelley is Collaborative Projects Curator at The Showroom, London where she has coordinated the Communal Knowledge programme since 2010. Communal Knowledge is a series of collaborative projects with local and international artists to propose and activate approaches to critical engagement with The Showroom’s social and cultural surroundings. Communal Knowledge is critically engaged with the possibilities for a gallery education programme to work in ways that respond to artistic practice and different contexts. This is articulated through producing work, events and alliances that address the role of art operating within and responding to themes including pedagogy, work/labour, feminist legacies, precarity, the dialectic of social re/production, class and gender. She is also a member of the Cinenova Working Group, a non-profit organisation dedicated to distributing films and videos made by women.

The Showroom is a contemporary art space focused on collaborative approaches to cultural production within its locality and beyond. Established in 1983, The Showroom gallery’s programme focuses on collaborative and process-driven approaches to production be that art work, exhibitions, events, discussions, publications, knowledge and relationships. The Showroom work closely with their local community, developing strong, long-term relationships with local groups and individuals which they bring together to work in partnership with artists on specific projects and commissions which feeds into their programme as a whole.

Irene Revell is a curator whose work seeks out new contexts and connections for practices with challenging social and political implications. Much of her work since 2004 has been with the London-based curatorial agency Electra, where she was Artistic Director from 2011-15. She has been a member of the Cinenova Working Group, which oversees the running of the Cinenova feminist film distribution organisation, since 2006. She is the Visiting Curator for the MA Sound Arts at UAL, where she holds an AHRC TECHNE award for her doctoral research on the ‘feminist performance score’. Recent collaborative projects include the ongoing Cinenova series Now Showing; The Multiversal Score, Wysing Arts Centre, 2015; and Someone Else Can Clean Up This Mess, Flat Time House, 2014. Recent writing includes contributions to Women Artists, Feminism and the Moving Image (ed Lucy Reynolds, I.B.Tauris, forthcoming); Oncurating Journal Issue 29 (with Lina Džuverović); Camera Austria Issue 130 (with Kerstin Schroedinger) and she was associate editor of Aftershow: Pauline Boudry/Renate Lorenz (Sternberg, 2014).

Artist and writer Ghislaine Leung, lives and works in London and Brussels. Recent solo projects include The Moves, Cell Project Space, London; 078746844, WIELS, Brussels; Soft Open Shut, Studio Voltaire, London and group projects, Violent Incident, Vleeshal, Middelburg; Prosu(u)mer, EKKM, Tallinn and Performance Capture, Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam. Recent writings in How To Sleep Faster, LA.NL, Amsterdam and Pure Fiction’s Dysfiction, Frankfurt with her collection of writings Partners forthcoming in 2017. Leung is editor of Versuch Press and member of PUBLIKATIONEN + EDITIONEN. She was resident at WIELS, Brussels 2015 and Hospitalfield, Arbroath in 2016.

Radio Anti is a temporary online and FM radio station that investigates a range of theoretical and material subjects through intermittent broadcasts; each of which is unique in its time, place and participants. Radio Anti was established in 2013 by artists Ross Jardine and Matthew de Kersaint Giraudeau. Since then, it has broadcast from a number of sites including Serpentine Galleries, London; Bloc Projects, Sheffield; Art Licks Weekend and 38b in London. Radio Anti recently featured in Control Magazine and is exhibiting at Laure Genillard Gallery, London, until 8 April 2017.

Helen Nisbet is the 2017/18 Curatorial Fellow at Cubitt Gallery. Helen has worked across a range of contexts including social practice and commissioning, most recently for UP Projects, Open Source 2016 and Arts Council Collection’s 70th anniversary commissions. She is also the co-founder of collaborative duo Hi Barbara and founder of Shetland Night, a series of events celebrating her native Shetland Islands. She began her tenure at Cubitt in January with a 3-month research period, and her programme will begin in April.

 

Reclaiming the Curatorial is devised by Jenny Richards in collaboration with Cubitt’s Gallery Projects and Development Manager Fabio Altamura.

Jenny Richards is curator of Marabouparken Konsthall, Stockholm running the 2 year research programme Acts of Self Ruin. Her research, writing and projects focus on the politics of collaborative practices. She was previously co-director of Konsthall C, Stockholm where together with Jens Strandberg she developed Home Works, an exhibition programme exploring the politics of domestic work and the home including exhibitions with Mierle Laderman Ukeles, Stephan Dillemuth, Ciara Phillips and Joanna Lombard. In 2012 she started Manual Labours, an ongoing collaborative research project with Sophie Hope examining physical relationship to work.

 

Image: Artists from Nýló – The Living Art Museum, Reykjavík. Produced with Ciara Phillips within her exhibition Warm Friends, Cold Cash, Konsthall C, Stockholm, 2015.

 

 

 

OCTOBER 2016 – ART CRITICISM: PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE

REPEAT

 

Art Criticism course_web

 

Due to high demand, current Cubitt Curatorial Fellow and critic Morgan Quaintance is leading a repeat of his course on art criticism. Devised to give participants practical information and an understanding of the discipline’s history and current possibilities, emphasis will also be placed on exploring criticism’s social and political contexts, and the use, development and different approaches to style, rhetoric and perspective. The course is enhanced to include two additional sessions, one of which will be a seminar giving participants further opportunity for discussion and debate.

 

TUESDAYS 6.30 – 8.30 PM, 25 October – 29 November 2016, CUBITT STUDIO 5

£75 / £60 student concessions / £30 unwaged (+ booking fee)

Tickets can be purchased through Eventbrite from the 11th of August 2016. Places are limited so please book early to avoid disappointment.

 

Session 1: The first two hundred years, 25 October

We’ll survey the activity of art critics across the 18th and 19th centuries, tracking their evolution from salon commentators and neoclassical enthusiasts, to supporters of individual expression, Romanticism and the sublime.

Session 2: Criticism in the twentieth century, 1 November

With formalism at one end and postmodernism at the other, the 21st century saw the USA enter the fray, magazines proliferate, and the explosion of different perspectives through critical theory, postcolonial thinking, feminism, queer theory and more. We’ll look at how all of this informed, deepened, politicised and democratized criticism. Or did it?

Session 3: Style, rhetoric and perspective, 8 November

Continuing from where critical theory and postmodernism left off, we’ll consider different approaches to style, looking at how specific writers choose to present their arguments, and, perhaps by extension, themselves. Through analysis of different modes of address, tone and rhetorical form, particular attention will be paid to criticality (is it performed or actually enacted?), political engagement (is it important?) and personal risk (should a critic embrace it?)

Session 4: The 21st Century: Crisis? What crisis? – Part 1, 15 November

Although many column inches have been devoted to the ‘crisis of criticism’ there is, at present, more criticism then ever before in both the art world and the wider cultural scene. In this final session we’ll look at criticism today in print. How has its proliferation effected the production of contemporary art? Is it a pluralistic field in which a multitude of critical positions are convincingly articulated? Is ‘real’ criticism happening anymore, or is it all just description?

Session 5: The 21st Century: Crisis? What crisis? – Part 2, 22 November

We’ll continue our investigation of criticism in the 21st Century, with a specific focus on criticism on the internet.

Session 6: Seminar: Group Discussion, 29 November

In this final session we’ll engage in a focused and directed group discussion.

 

 

APRIL 2016 – ART CRITICISM: PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE

Current Cubitt Curatorial Fellow and critic Morgan Quaintance leads a course on art criticism, focusing on its past, present and future. Devised to give participants practical information and an understanding of the discipline’s history and current possibilities, emphasis will also be placed on exploring criticism’s social and political contexts, and the use, development and different approaches to style, rhetoric and perspective.

 

TUESDAYS 6.30 – 8.30 PM, 5 – 26 APRIL 2016, CUBITT STUDIO 5

£50 /£40 student concessions /£15 unwaged (+ booking fee)

This event is now SOLD OUT. If you are interested in attending a repeat session later on in the year, please email us to register your interest: office@cubittartists.org.uk

 

Day 1: The first two hundred years, 5 April

We’ll survey the activity of art critics across the 18th and 19th centuries, tracking their evolution from salon commentators and neoclassical enthusiasts, to supporters of individual expression, Romanticism and the sublime.

Day 2: Criticism in the twentieth century, 12 April

With formalism at one end and postmodernism at the other, the 21st century saw the USA enter the fray, magazines proliferate, and the explosion of different perspectives through critical theory, postcolonial thinking, feminism, queer theory and more. We’ll look at how all of this informed, deepened, politicised and democratized criticism. Or did it?

Day 3: Style, rhetoric and perspective, 19 April

Continuing from where critical theory and postmodernism left off, we’ll consider different approaches to style, looking at how specific writers choose to present their arguments, and, perhaps by extension, themselves. Through analysis of different modes of address, tone and rhetorical form, particular attention will be paid to criticality (is it performed or actually enacted?), political engagement (is it important?) and personal risk (should a critic embrace it?).

Day 4: The 21st Century: Crisis? What crisis?, 26 April

Although many column inches have been devoted to the ‘crisis of criticism’ there is, at present, more criticism then ever before in both the art world and the wider cultural scene. In this final session we’ll look at criticism today in print and online. How has its proliferation effected the production of contemporary art? Is it a pluralistic field in which a multitude of critical positions are convincingly articulated? Is ‘real’ criticism happening anymore, or is it all just description?

 

Morgan Quaintance is a London-based writer, musician, broadcaster and curator, and the 2015/16 Curatorial Fellow at Cubitt Gallery. He is a regular contributor to  Art MonthlyArt ReviewFriezeRhizome.org and a number of curatorial sites and blogs. He is a contributing editor for E-Flux’s online publishing portal Art Agenda, is a founding member of the curatorial collective DAM PROJECTS. As a presenter he currently works with the BBC’s flagship arts programme The Culture Show, and is also the producer of Studio Visit, a weekly hour-long interviews-based programme, broadcast on Resonance 104.4 FM, featuring international contemporary artists as guests.

 

 

 

 

 

NOVEMBER 2015 – CUBITT HOSTS ANTIUNIVERSITY NOW! EVENTS

 

AntiUniversity-header_1250

 

Following the Antinuniversity of London of 1968, Cubitt is pleased to support AntiUniversity Now! hosting two events on Friday 20 November. The festival challenged academic hierarchy through an open invitation to teach and learn any subject, in any form, anywhere.

Psychometry of Text: The Limits of Reading? Friday 20 Nov, 4-5.30pm

This workshop uses some of the conventions associated with reading groups and psychic development circles to explore the limits of reading, where ‘reading’ can also be an act of non-rational, non-verbal expressing of information, with information not conventionally codified, and obtained from non-textual sources, e.g. an object (psychometry) or a person (telepathy). Including a reading exercise followed by group discussion. Hosted by the collective Vax Vladivostok.

Browsing the Audacious Mobile Research Library, Friday 20 November 6.30-7.30pm

Neoliberalism has emphasised and enforced the market in so many aspects of our lives that it seems difficult to think without it; similarly, the internet can feel like a surveillance cum control system. This lecture/performance features sounds which expose, crack and attempt to break out, to research core questions: who owns the airwaves? What can music, information and noise become? What constitutes resistance to the digital? Hosted by broadcast/performance duo Trans/Human with writer and teacher Dr. Matthew Cheeseman, University of Sheffield.

 

CUSD-E3WIAAvs_web

Browsing the Audacious Mobile Research Library, 20 November 2015

For more information on both events, please visit AntiUniversity.

 

 

 

 

JULY 2015 – RECLAIMING THE CURATORIAL: A SUMMER WORKSHOP

 


Model for a Qualitative Society, Moderna Museet, Stockholm 1968.

 

Cubitt’s Reclaiming the Curatorial Summer Workshop was an intensive, practical, three-day course for individuals interested in developing self-organised platforms for curating and presenting contemporary practices. Based at Cubitt studios, a leading artist-led organisation, this consisted of workshops and seminars led by invited artists & curators, alongside tours to some of London’s inspiring peer-led and self-initiated projects.

In the past ten years curating courses within higher education have tended to focus on institutional curating, whilst a rich activity of curatorial practices led by artists and creative practitioners has been producing exhibitions, setting up spaces, and experimenting with new collaborative working methods. In a time when arts and culture is facing significant challenges to its funding and operation there is an urgent need for new models of producing and sharing contemporary practice.

The Cubitt Summer Workshop was designed for artists, curators, curatorial students and graduates and other creative professionals interested in developing self-initiated, peer-led and alternative forms of curatorial practice. The Summer Workshop offered a small group of participants the chance to take part in a focused study: developing skills in self-organised practice; alongside learning directly from inspiring individuals and collectives.

 

 

IMG_0781_small

 

IMG_0789_small

 

 

Day 1: Public Research

Day 1 begins with an introduction to themes of the workshop, raising questions around the development of self organised and expanded curatorial practices. This is followed by a presentation from Milly Thompson, Cubitt artist and former member of BANK, an artists collective active in London between 1991-2003. They exhibited collectively and ran the spaces BANKSPACE and DOG.  In the afternoon, a workshop with Karen Mirza investigates the development of her collaborative practice with Brad Butler in relationship to setting up the artist-run organisation no.w.here and the challenges faced in its development. The day concludes with a visit to the influential 56a Infoshop in Walworth, South London co-run by Chris Jones, a long term radical social centre co-run by Chris Jones, who is member of Ultra-red, a sound art collective that develops and tests procedures for collective listening that contribute directly to political struggles.

Day 2: Collective Production

Day 2 focuses on ideas of collective production beginning with Past Presents, a workshop with filmmaker Ed Webb-Ingall  exploring participatory models of production developed in the 1970s to ask questions about what it means to reactivate archival materials and historical practices as a way to develop approaches for working together in the present. The afternoon sees a visit to The Showroom, a space for contemporary art focused on a collaborative and process-driven approach to commissions and exhibitions, with an introductory talk by Director and former Cubitt Bursary holder Emily Pethick .

Day 3: Expanded Exhibitions

The final day focuses on methods of expanding the exhibition beyond the gallery, through publications, radio and other platforms. Gavin Wade, co-founder of Eastside Projects, discusses his practice as artist-curator in relation to his role as Director of Eastside Projects. Andrea Francke‘s workshop will explore manuals as a publishing format. Historically manuals have been used by feminist movements or the American Back-to-the-land movement to create communities and to establish conversations over distance and time. The two hour slot will be used to create a new manual using the materials and experiences the participants gathered throughout the summer workshop. The day concludes with a presentation from the recipient of the new Cubitt Curatorial Fellowship, Morgan Quaintance, sharing his approach to translating practice into public situations through the work of the curatorial collective DAM PROJECTS and his broadcasting background.

Resources  Christopher Jones_The Empty Space of the Invitation_2013

 

Contributors

Milly Thompson is an artist (and Cubitt member) interested in aspiration, ambition, self consciousness and pleasure in relation to the artworld and social codes, through a broad range of materials including digital media, sculpture, text, drawing, photography and painting.  She worked as part of the collaborative art group BANK from 1994 to 2003 and since then has pursued her solo career. Thompson has received numerous awards and grants and has been a recipient of the Paul Hamlyn Award and The Sargant Scholarship at the British School at Rome. As well as being a Visiting Tutor in the Painting programme at the RCA, she is a Lecturer on MFA Fine Art at Goldsmiths College.  BANK work is held in collections at Tate, MoMA New York and Printed Matter.

Karen Mirza and Brad Butler’s multi-layered practice consists of filmmaking, drawing, installation, performance and curating. Their work challenges terms such as participation, collaboration, the social turn and the traditional roles of the artist as producer and the audience as recipient.   Since 2007, Mirza and Butler have been developing a body of work entitled the Museum of non Participation. Recent exhibitions include The New Deal at the Walker Art Centre (April – July 2013), Performa 13 (2013) and Derin Devlet (Deep State) at Galeri NON (Jan – Feb 2014). The Museum of non Participation is nominated for the Artes Mundi Award 2014 for visual artists who engage with the human condition, social reality and lived experience.  In 2004, Mirza and Butler formed no.w.here, an artist-run organisation that combines film production with critical dialogue about contemporary image making.

Chris Jones is collective member of 56a Infoshop in Elephant & Castle, a long term radical social centre. He is also part of Southwark Notes, a blog and active research group contesting the regeneration of North Southwark with a particular focus on demolition and displacement on local council estates. Chris is also a member of Ultra-red, a sound art collective that develops and tests procedures for collective listening that contribute directly to political struggles.

Ed Webb-Ingall is a filmmaker and writer with an interest in exploring practices and forms of collaboration. He is a TECHNE PhD candidate at Royal Holloway University, researching into the history and practice of community video in London from 1968-1981. He is currently part of the Communal Knowledge program at The Showroom, London. Recent projects include LUX -where he was writer in residence- Open School East, Tate Liverpool and The British Film Institute.

Gavin Wade is director of Eastside Projects, Birmingham, an artist-curator and publisher of Strategic Questions. In 2010 he received the Paul Hamlyn Foundation Breakthrough Fund Award for exceptional cultural entrepreneurs. He has curated solo exhibitions with Gunilla Klingberg, Mike Nelson, Yangjiang Group, William Pope.L, Dan Graham, Carey Young, Liam Gillick, Joanne Tatham & Tom O’Sullivan, Nathan Coley and Bas Jan Ader. Curated projects include: Painting Show (2011-12), Eastside Projects; Public Structures, Guangzhou Triennial, China (2005); and In the Midst of Things, Bournville (1999). Books include UPCYCLE THIS BOOK, Sternberg (2013); Has Man A Function In Universe? Book Works (2008); and The Interruptors: A Non-Simultaneous Novel, Article Press (2005).

Andrea Francke is a peruvian artist based in London. Her practice explore the connections between personal and subjective experiences to public police and ideological frameworks. Some of her current projects include: Invisible Spaces of Parenthood, an on-going artistic research project and collaboration with Kim Dhillon, exploring non-representational politics of motherhood and the labour of caring for children; and The Piracy Project, a collaboration with Eva Weinmayr as part of the AND Publishing program, that explores the philosophical, legal and practical implications of book piracy.

Morgan Quaintance is a London-based writer, musician, broadcaster and curator, and the 2015/16 Curatorial Fellow at Cubitt Gallery. Born in South London, he is a regular contributor to  Art MonthlyArt ReviewFriezeRhizome.org and a number of curatorial sites and blogs. He is a contributing editor for E-Flux’s online publishing portal Art Agenda, is a founding member of the curatorial collective DAM PROJECTS. As a presenter he currently works with the BBC’s flagship arts programme The Culture Show, and is also the producer of Studio Visit, a weekly hour-long interviews-based programme, broadcast on Resonance 104.4 FM, featuring international contemporary artists as guests.

Devised by Jenny Richards (co-director of the artist-led gallery Konsthall C, Stockholm) in collaboration with Cubitt’s Fabio Altamura (Gallery Projects and Development Manager) and Daniel Baker (Education Research and Strategy Director).

 

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