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Aya Haidar: Out Of Service

aya web

 

Preview Thursday 26 September 6.30–8.30pm
27 Sept–27 Oct 2019
Open: Wed–Sun 12–6PM

Out Of Service presents a new commission by London-based Lebanese artist Aya Haidar.

New work has been developed over a 9-month period through conversations, workshops and time spent with groups, campaigns, community organisers and cultural workers all working with a focus on domestic and immaterial labour.

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bio:

Aya Haidar is a London based Lebanese artist whose practice develops artworks through conversations around shared interests and concerns relating to home, diaspora, memory and imagination – often using embroidering, craft and collage. Past works have focussed on the recycling of found and disposable objects making works that explore loss, migration and memory, with a personal connection to the history of a region [the Middle East] explored through the histories contained within personal objects/belongings. Haidar re-uses such objects to re-create narratives, to explore memory relating to home, diaspora, memory and imagination, producing hand-embroidered interventions onto culturally and historically specific objects.

 

Rita Munus: Write It Speak It Move It

write it

 

Workshops: July–September 2019
Public Presentation: Sat 7 Sept 2019, 5–7pm. Booking essential book here
Screening event co-presented with LUX: Wed 11 Sept 2019, 7–8.30pm book here

 

Write It Speak It Move It is a project devised by Rita Munus, a writing and events collective comprising of Sop and Charlotte Heather, both of whom live with chronic illness.

 

Rita Munus will host a series of workshops on writing, vocals, percussion and movement with an invited group of artists across July and August at Cubitt Gallery. Work will be collectively developed to ask how we understand our chronically ill bodies, amplifying words and sounds that need to be heard in relation to capacity, capitalism, institutions, loved ones and the public. The project will not be about generating definitive answers or theories, but to investigate similarities, differences and hidden parts.

Join us on September 7th when Rita Munus and the Write It Speak It Move It group will present the resulting form/s at Cubitt gallery – experimenting, extracting, sharing, swapping, instructing, listening, recording, scoring, drawing, exchanging and demonstrating.

This is a relaxed event, this means that if you tic, shout or move about, you’re more than welcome. Please contact us if you have any particular access needs by phone 208 7278 8226 or email info@cubittartists.org. Cubitt is fully wheelchair accessible and there are wheelchair accessible toilet facilities. Assistance dogs are welcome in all spaces.

The Write It Speak It Move It group is: Sop and Charlotte Heather (Rita Munus), Juliet Johnson, Zuleika Lebow, Irene Revell and Lucie Russell.

BIO:

Rita Munus are a collective that runs writing workshops and events with a focus on radical creative practice and process as a vehicle for topical discussion, exploration, play and catharsis. The collective is made up of writer Charlotte Heather and artist Sop and focuses predominantly on issues of chronic illness, queerness, otherness and capitalism, engaging with and prioritising participants who have direct experience with the themes.

The first series of workshops ILLTH looked specifically at chronic illness, the sick body and capitalism. The sick body is seen as ‘less than’ within a capitalist framework, because it cannot participate in production to a ‘satisfactory’ level. But the sick body is not ‘less than’. Focus on ‘getting better’ or ‘being well’ puts unnecessary force on the sick body to achieve something that for many chronically ill people is impossible. Often this actually makes the body more sick. Capitalism leads to over exertion – capitalism leads to chronic illness – illness struggles to fit into capitalism, thus the circular plot. There is a distinct parallel between ILLTH’s focus on process, not production, and the need for the sick body to be able to focus on just being, as opposed to the binaries of sick and well and ‘getting better’.

Future workshops will cover mental health, the pharmaceutical industry, the physical body and its movement, gender identity and sexual identities and behaviours, all in conversation with capitalism.

“The workshops let you write, but what you write is not for others consumption. You do not create a final product. You enter an ongoing series of discussions with each other on subjects which apply to the participants. You write something that you can do whatever you want with. You write because you have something to say, even if it is only to yourself. You write to play; with words, ideas, the world, yourself, others. You do not write to commodify your feelings, to conform to production, or to make yourself palatable to others. You do not write to be consumed, you write to experience writing.”

rita – to tear, scratch, write

munus – service performed for the community, duty, work

Commissioned and supported by Unlimited, celebrating the work of disabled artists, with funding from Spirit of 2012.

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Rita Munus: Film Screening

LUX2

RITA MUNUS: WRITE IT SPEAK IT MOVE IT

Film screening event co-presented with LUX

Wednesday 11 September 2019, 7–8.30pm. Book here

Sop from Rita Munus in collaboration with Charlotte Procter (Cinenova/LUX) present a screening event as part of the Write It Speak It Move It project. The screening is an attempt to describe the complex relationship between a life lived with chronic illness and medical institutions; including diagnoses, medications and medicalised narratives which often simplify the sick person’s sense of self and agency.

The films chosen present contrasts to formalised routes of medical care and instead draw on friendship and the informal structure of mutual care and support given from our chosen family – our friends, which often passes unacknowledged but can be life saving.

This is a relaxed screening, This means that if you tic, shout or move about, you’re more than welcome. Please contact us if you have any particular access needs by phone 208 7278 8226 or email info@cubittartists.org. Cubitt is fully wheelchair accessible and there are wheelchair accessible toilet facilities. Assistance dogs are welcome in all spaces.

Commissioned and supported by Unlimited, celebrating the work of disabled artists, with funding from Spirit of 2012.

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Domestic Work is Work

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Domestic Work is Work
An exhibition of recent education projects and campaign work
August 7–11 2019
Open Wed–Sun, 12–6pm
Sun 11, 12–6pm: on the hour exhibition tours and join the afternoon workshop activities and campaign discussions

Domestic Work is Work is organised by The Voice of Domestic Workers and hosted by Cubitt. The exhibition will present the group’s recent film My Home is Not My Home a collectively produced arts project that emerged as a response to the exploitation, invisibility and marginality of migrant domestic workers due to their class, gender, race and UK immigration laws.

Since October 2018 The Voice of Domestic Workers have been a part of the current Structures That Cooperate programme at Cubitt. On a practical level the spaces at Cubitt have been made available to support the group’s ongoing work and collaborations with cultural workers, educators and activists. The sharing of space has also been the grounds for developing forms of solidarity and knowledge exchange in relation to work, education, precarity and collective organising.

Workshops, events and discussions have asked how strategies of art production and distribution can inform and support social movements related to labour and visibility – intending also to build new alliances that can propose strategies for continued collective working. This collaboration to align and support labour struggles across different sectors is in tandem to conversations with W.A.G.E. the Cubitt Cooperative and others to address models of cooperativity and resource distribution in the arts.

On the last day of this six-day presentation join members of VODW 12–6pm, for an ‘open studio’ format which will present hourly introductions to their work and the work on display and 2–4pm join a workshop with Barcelona based illustrator Abigail Tarraso who is supporting the production of a new campaign publication.

A self-organised network and campaigning group calling for justice and rights for Britain’s sixteen thousand migrant domestic workers. The Voice of Domestic Workers provide educational and community activities for domestic workers – including English language lessons, drama and art classes, and employment advice, and mount rescues for domestic workers stuck with abusive employers.​ Their work seeks to end discrimination and protect migrant domestic workers living in the UK by providing or assisting in the provision of education, training, healthcare and legal advice.

www.thevoiceofdomesticworkers.com

Domestic Work is Work

 

15

Domestic Work is Work
An exhibition of recent education projects and campaign work
August 7–11 2019
Open Wed–Sun, 12–6pm
Sun 11, 12–6pm: on the hour exhibition tours and join the afternoon workshop activities and campaign discussions

Domestic Work is Work is organised by The Voice of Domestic Workers and hosted by Cubitt. The exhibition will present the group’s recent film My Home is Not My Home a collectively produced arts project that emerged as a response to the exploitation, invisibility and marginality of migrant domestic workers due to their class, gender, race and UK immigration laws.

Since October 2018 The Voice of Domestic Workers have been a part of the current Structures That Cooperate programme at Cubitt. On a practical level the spaces at Cubitt have been made available to support the group’s ongoing work and collaborations with cultural workers, educators and activists. The sharing of space has also been the grounds for developing forms of solidarity and knowledge exchange in relation to work, education, precarity and collective organising.

Workshops, events and discussions have asked how strategies of art production and distribution can inform and support social movements related to labour and visibility – intending also to build new alliances that can propose strategies for continued collective working. This collaboration to align and support labour struggles across different sectors is in tandem to conversations with W.A.G.E. the Cubitt Cooperative and others to address models of cooperativity and resource distribution in the arts.

On the last day of this six-day presentation join members of VODW 12–6pm, for an ‘open studio’ format which will present hourly introductions to their work and the work on display and 2–4pm join a workshop with Barcelona based illustrator Abigail Tarraso who is supporting the production of a new campaign publication.

A self-organised network and campaigning group calling for justice and rights for Britain’s sixteen thousand migrant domestic workers. The Voice of Domestic Workers provide educational and community activities for domestic workers – including English language lessons, drama and art classes, and employment advice, and mount rescues for domestic workers stuck with abusive employers.​ Their work seeks to end discrimination and protect migrant domestic workers living in the UK by providing or assisting in the provision of education, training, healthcare and legal advice.

www.thevoiceofdomesticworkers.com

Rita Munus: Write It Speak It Move It

write it

 

Workshops: July–September 2019
Public Presentation: Sat 7 Sept 2019, 5–7pm. Booking essential book here
Screening event co-presented with LUX: Wed 11 Sept 2019, 7–8.30pm

 

Write It Speak It Move It is a project devised by Rita Munus, a writing and events collective comprising of Sop and Charlotte Heather, both of whom live with chronic illness.

Rita Munus will host a series of workshops on writing, vocals, percussion and movement with an invited group of artists across July and August at Cubitt Gallery. Work will be collectively developed to ask how we understand our chronically ill bodies, amplifying words and sounds that need to be heard in relation to capacity, capitalism, institutions, loved ones and the public. The project will not be about generating definitive answers or theories, but to investigate similarities, differences and hidden parts.

Join us on September 7th when Rita Munus and the Write It Speak It Move It group will present the resulting form/s at Cubitt gallery – experimenting, extracting, sharing, swapping, instructing, listening, recording, scoring, drawing, exchanging and demonstrating.

This is a relaxed event, this means that if you tic, shout or move about, you’re more than welcome. Please contact us if you have any particular access needs by phone 208 7278 8226 or email info@cubittartists.org. Cubitt is fully wheelchair accessible and there are wheelchair accessible toilet facilities. Assistance dogs are welcome in all spaces.

The Write It Speak It Move It group is: Sop and Charlotte Heather (Rita Munus), Juliet Johnson, Zuleika Lebow, Irene Revell and Lucie Russell.

BIO:

Rita Munus are a collective that runs writing workshops and events with a focus on radical creative practice and process as a vehicle for topical discussion, exploration, play and catharsis. The collective is made up of writer Charlotte Heather and artist Sop and focuses predominantly on issues of chronic illness, queerness, otherness and capitalism, engaging with and prioritising participants who have direct experience with the themes.

The first series of workshops ILLTH looked specifically at chronic illness, the sick body and capitalism. The sick body is seen as ‘less than’ within a capitalist framework, because it cannot participate in production to a ‘satisfactory’ level. But the sick body is not ‘less than’. Focus on ‘getting better’ or ‘being well’ puts unnecessary force on the sick body to achieve something that for many chronically ill people is impossible. Often this actually makes the body more sick. Capitalism leads to over exertion – capitalism leads to chronic illness – illness struggles to fit into capitalism, thus the circular plot. There is a distinct parallel between ILLTH’s focus on process, not production, and the need for the sick body to be able to focus on just being, as opposed to the binaries of sick and well and ‘getting better’.

Future workshops will cover mental health, the pharmaceutical industry, the physical body and its movement, gender identity and sexual identities and behaviours, all in conversation with capitalism.

“The workshops let you write, but what you write is not for others consumption. You do not create a final product. You enter an ongoing series of discussions with each other on subjects which apply to the participants. You write something that you can do whatever you want with. You write because you have something to say, even if it is only to yourself. You write to play; with words, ideas, the world, yourself, others. You do not write to commodify your feelings, to conform to production, or to make yourself palatable to others. You do not write to be consumed, you write to experience writing.”

rita – to tear, scratch, write

munus – service performed for the community, duty, work

Commissioned and supported by Unlimited, celebrating the work of disabled artists, with funding from Spirit of 2012.

u_logo2

Self does not understand: A film screening event organised by Erik Martinson

Demikhov Dog - Anastasia Sosunova

 

Self does not understand: A film screening event organised by Erik Martinson
Thursday 4 July | 7–8.45pm
Free, no booking required

 

Taking Serena Lee’s Second Tongues proposition, Canadian curator Erik Martinson has been invited to programme an evening of film and readings.

Self does not understand derives its title from a phrase spoken by the character Warlock in the 1980’s comic The New Mutants. Warlock is an alien with the power to meta-morph into any shape or form, though he has a difficult time understanding our world, needing to constantly learn about how humans communicate with each other. He identifies as ‘Self’ and his teammates are his ‘Self-friends’. One teammate in particular called Doug Ramsey, codenamed Cypher, has the mutant power to innately learn and understand languages rapidly, whether they are human, machinic, or alien in nature. These two characters’ lives are intertwined, from first encounter of communicating through patterned light, in the vein of Close Encounters of the Third Kind, to a complicated mutually symbiotic relationship. Through tragedy Warlock must come to terms with death, something his kind experiences and understands in some fundamentally different ways, prompting this programme’s title.

Self does not understand considers tiny translations between: ‘self’ and ‘self’, ‘self’ and ‘other self’, ‘self’ and ‘other’, ‘other’ and ‘other’, and various permutations or these arbitrary structures. When fluency and comprehension are closely examined, the solid ground they present is quickly revealed as ongoing, fragile calculations. Like a decimal place rounded-up, they are an approximation, even within the same language set. Fluency and comprehension are made up of so many encounters, of so many oscillations between understanding and not, until one seems to win out.

The event features a selection of readings and artists’ moving image. Artists presented include: Stephanie Comilang, Jessa Mockridge, Lana Lin, Shanzhai Lyric, Anastasia Sosunova, with a guest appearance by Vrillon.

Programme:

Q!hosa, afterword from Exercises: xhosa textbook fiction (unpublished), Jessa Mockridge, 2015, 15:00 (Live Reading)

The Endless Garment: I am an enemy of fantasy. A Group Poetry Reading by Shanzhai Lyric, 2016 – ongoing, 15:00

<intermission>

The 1977 Southern Television Alien Broadcast Interruption, NowYouKnow (Youtube), 2017, 7:42 (excerpt)

Demikhov Dog, Anastasia Sosunova, 2017, 7:24                                                        

Stranger Baby, Lana Lin, 1995, 13:54

Lumapit Sa Akin, Paraiso (Come To Me, Paradise), Stephanie Comilang, 2016, 25:46

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Erik Martinson (Canada/Latvia) is an independent curator and writer based in London, UK. He worked in Toronto at Vtape, a not-for-profit video art distributor, from 2005-2014, and was a member of the Pleasure Dome curatorial collective from 2006-2014. He completed his MFA in Curating at Goldsmiths, University of London (2016). He has curated screenings/exhibitions for: Art Star 3 Video Art Biennale at SAW Gallery (2007); Vtape’s Curatorial Incubator (2009); the Rendezvous with Madness Film Festival (2010, 2011); the Images Festival (2012); A Space Gallery (2012); Art Gallery of Mississauga (2013); Institute of Contemporary Arts London (2015); Chalton Gallery (2016); LUX Artists’ Moving Image (2016, 2017); Contemporary Art Centre Vilnius (2016); The Ryder (2017); Toronto International Film Festival’s Wavelengths Series (2017); Close-Up Film Centre (2018); Whitechapel Gallery (2018); Process Experimental Film Festival, Riga (2018); Contemporary Art Museum of Estonia (EKKM), Tallinn (2018); and North Norwegian Art Centre (2019). He participated in: Independent Curators International (ICI) Curatorial Intensive on Time-Based Media, New York (2013); and the selection jury for Videonale.15 at Kunstmuseum Bonn (2015). He was assistant editor for the Nuclear Culture Source Book (edited by Ele Carpenter) published by Black Dog Publishing in partnership with Bildmuseet and Arts Catalyst (2016). Recent residencies include: Rupert, Vilnius (2016) and Nordland College of Art and Film, Kabelvåg (2018/2019). He has received support from: inaugural Stuart Croft Foundation Special Projects Award (2017) and Canada Council for the Arts: ‘Research and Creation’ Grant (2018).

 

Supported by Canada House, Canada Council for the Arts, Arts Council England and Outset Contemporary Art Fund.

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Image: still Demikhov Dog, Anastasia Sosunova, 2017, 7:24

Serena Lee: Second Tongues

second tongues

 

Preview Thursday 13 June 6.30–8.30pm
14 June–14 July 2019
Open: Wed–Sun 12–6PM

 

Let’s imagine the future of language; not simply the languages that we hear most often and take up the most space today, nor those that experts predict will survive and those that will not, but every single possible future for all languages that have ever existed, and for everyone to whom they belong, and those that come to belong.

Second Tongues is the title of a speculative fiction narrative developed by Toronto-based artist Serena Lee, developed collectively with others and exhibited in multiple parts for Cubitt’s ongoing Structures That Cooperate Programme.

The project departs from a premise where in the future, we all speak a second language not of our choosing. Second Tongues becomes a speculative fiction world-building framework for critically engaging with experiences of nationhood, kinship, market-driven globalisation as they relate to histories and practices of language. Second Tongues is a proposition for reimagining futures decentered and reorganised.

The exhibited elements of Second Tongues have been developed through conversations with London-based language education organisations, migrant worker and newcomer community services, socio-linguistic researchers and public audiences. In addition the artist has collaborated with Black Shuck, a London-based co-operative to develop and present an augmented reality layer to the exhibition space for further speculation and translation.

The narrative plays out as fragments of conversation with the Second Tongues collaborators across a 3-channel video installation (duration 11-minutes), and a constellation of augmented reality aspects.

The installation continues to use and adapt Clemence Seilles’ ongoing scenography for the Structures That Cooperate programme. The foam slabs, previously used as a sound insulating flooring for Ain bailey’s exhibition have been rolled to reference cylinder seals, an ancient form of communicating narrative. Salt dough magnets were produced with members of The Voice of Domestic Workers during a language discussion workshop; wall texts contain questions derived from conversations with Second Tongues collaborators. Second Tongues is an ongoing project that also lives online at: serenalee.hotglue.me/secondtongues

Read Persilia Caton’s review for Canadian Art online here

Events:

Thurs 4 July | 7-8.30pm Self does not understand: A film screening event organised by Erik Martinson
Free, no booking required
Read more here

The Sounds of what we’ve always known: a song-writing workshop with The Voice of Domestic Workers.
Free, no booking required
Details to follow

Serena Lee is a Canadian artist whose practice stems from a fascination with polyphony – a musical term for multiple, simultaneous melodies – and its radical potential. Serena’s art work integrates a broad range of media: for example, current projects involve elements of VR, textile-based sculpture, public conversation, and tai chi.  More broadly, she incorporates cinema, performance, voice, image and text, and references classical piano performance and musical theory.

Her work has been presented across Canada and internationally in Europe, the UK, the USA, Indonesia and China; she is a member of the feminist art collective, Read-in, based mainly in the Netherlands, which explores the embodied, situated, and political aspects of collective reading aloud. Serena also collaborates with artist Christina Battle as SHATTERED MOON ALLIANCE, to unpack narratives of time travel through a series of participatory workshops and transmedia publication.
Serena holds a Master of Fine Arts degree from the Piet Zwart Institute in Rotterdam (NL)  and an Associate Diploma in piano performance from the Royal Conservatory of Music (CA). She is an active member of the creative community in Toronto as an artist, educator, and in artist-run-centre governance. .http://www.serenalee.com/

Ongoing and off-site collaborations include working with Clemence Seilles on the scenography of the gallery space, The Voice of Domestic Workers in residence, Schooling & Culture working at Arts and Media School Islington and research with W.A.G.E.

This is exhibition is supported by Canada House, Canada Council for the Arts, Arts Council England and Outset Contemporary Art Fund.

 

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Cubitt Education: International Exchange

 
Throughout 2018, Cubitt Education hosted visits from Education staff at Ujazdowski Castle Centre for Contemporary Art, Warsaw as part of an Erasmus-funded exchange project. Ujazdowski staff have been expanding their experience of engagement techniques and travelled to Amsterdam to learn storytelling techniques, before taking part in workshops with older people at Cubitt with Lucy Steggals and Joshua Sofaer, as well as visiting each of the three Community Studios sites (St Luke’s Community Centre, 75 Mildmay Street and Arts and Media School Islington).


To conclude the programme, Esther Collins and Lydia Ashman from Cubitt Education took a trip to CCCA Warsaw in April. They spent time with Anna Kierkosz and her colleagues in the Education department, learning about how the team works with and in response to the exhibition programme. They also met with Marianna Dobkowska, Residencies Curator, and heard about the evolution of the residency programme and how it increasingly supports socially-engaged practice. We found common interest in working with specific marginalised groups, making artists’ studio work and residency activities more visible to the public, and allowing the development of these programmes to be led by artists’ practice.

 

Centre image: Installation shot of Janek Simon’s exhibition Synthetic Folklore at Ujazdowski Castle Centre for Contemporary Art
Right image: Installation shot of Marta Krześlak’s exhibition Party at the Artists Club at Ujazdowski Castle Centre for Contemporary Art

Photos: Esther Collins

 

Serena Lee: Second Tongues

 

second tongues

 

Preview Thursday 13 June 6.30–8.30pm
14 June–14 July 2019
Open: Wed–Sun 12–6PM

Let’s imagine the future of language; not simply the languages that we hear most often and take up the most space today, nor those that experts predict will survive and those that will not, but every single possible future for all languages that have ever existed, and for everyone to whom they belong, and those that come to belong.

Second Tongues is the title of a speculative fiction narrative developed by Toronto-based artist Serena Lee, developed collectively with others and exhibited in multiple parts for Cubitt’s ongoing Structures That Cooperate Programme.

The project departs from a premise where in the future, we all speak a second language not of our choosing. Second Tongues becomes a speculative fiction world-building framework for critically engaging with experiences of nationhood, kinship, market-driven globalisation as they relate to histories and practices of language. Second Tongues is a proposition for reimagining futures decentered and reorganised.

The exhibited elements of Second Tongues have been developed through conversations with London-based language education organisations, migrant worker and newcomer community services, socio-linguistic researchers and public audiences. In addition the artist has collaborated with Black Shuck, a London-based co-operative to develop and present an augmented reality layer to the exhibition space for further speculation and translation.

The narrative plays out as fragments of conversation with the Second Tongues collaborators across a 3-channel video installation (duration 11-minutes), and a constellation of augmented reality aspects.

The installation continues to use and adapt Clemence Seilles’ ongoing scenography for the Structures That Cooperate programme. The foam slabs, previously used as a sound insulating flooring for Ain bailey’s exhibition have been rolled to reference cylinder seals, an ancient form of communicating narrative. Salt dough magnets were produced with members of The Voice of Domestic Workers during a language discussion workshop; wall texts contain questions derived from conversations with Second Tongues collaborators. Second Tongues is an ongoing project that also lives online at: serenalee.hotglue.me/secondtongues

 

Read Persilia Caton’s review for Canadian Art online here

 

Events:

Thurs 4 July | 7-8.30pm Self does not understand: A film screening event organised by Erik Martinson
Free, no booking required
Read more here

The Sounds of what we’ve always known: a song-writing workshop with The Voice of Domestic Workers.
Free, no booking required
Details to follow

Serena Lee is a Canadian artist whose practice stems from a fascination with polyphony – a musical term for multiple, simultaneous melodies – and its radical potential. Serena’s art work integrates a broad range of media: for example, current projects involve elements of VR, textile-based sculpture, public conversation, and tai chi.  More broadly, she incorporates cinema, performance, voice, image and text, and references classical piano performance and musical theory.

Her work has been presented across Canada and internationally in Europe, the UK, the USA, Indonesia and China; she is a member of the feminist art collective, Read-in, based mainly in the Netherlands, which explores the embodied, situated, and political aspects of collective reading aloud. Serena also collaborates with artist Christina Battle as SHATTERED MOON ALLIANCE, to unpack narratives of time travel through a series of participatory workshops and transmedia publication.
Serena holds a Master of Fine Arts degree from the Piet Zwart Institute in Rotterdam (NL)  and an Associate Diploma in piano performance from the Royal Conservatory of Music (CA). She is an active member of the creative community in Toronto as an artist, educator, and in artist-run-centre governance. .http://www.serenalee.com/

Ongoing and off-site collaborations include working with Clemence Seilles on the scenography of the gallery space, The Voice of Domestic Workers in residence, Schooling & Culture working at Arts and Media School Islington and research with W.A.G.E.

This is exhibition is supported by Canada House, Canada Council for the Arts, Arts Council England and Outset Contemporary Art Fund.

 

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OPEN STUDIOS. Saturday 11 May 2019. 12-6pm

Cubitt Open Studios. 11 May 2019. 12-6pm

Cubitt Open Studios.

EVERYONE WELCOME: Open Studios, Saturday, 11 May 2019. 12-6pm

FREE

Beyond Cubitt Gallery is a labyrinth of studios, occupied by Cubitts 32 artist members. This is a rare opportunity to meet them, see some of their work in the place of its making, and find out how one of Londons most established arts cooperative functions.

On the day:

12:30pm: Fishfinger Sandwich. Artist talk by Sarah Stanton. Studio 3.

2pm: Artists Talk. Annabel Frearson: Studio 5.

3pm: Amazing Grace. Performance by Elaine Mitchener as part of Ain Bailey: And We’ll Always be a Disco in the Glow of Love. Gallery.

4pm: Artist talk by Ben Edge. Studio 5.

Throughout the day:

Treasure hunt (for children)- ask a member of staff for a map to go on the treasure hunt around the studios and find the prize. Created by Nicky Hoberman.

Cubitt: An artist led history. By Morgan Quaintance. Screening. Studio 5.

Portrait drawing: Sarah Pickstone. Studio 31.

And more throughout the day!

 

No problem if you don’t want to attend the talks, you can just come in and have a wonder.

A full list of artists who have studios at Cubitt can be found here.

 

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