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And We’ll Always Be A Disco.. Rebecca Bellantoni performance

Rebecca Bellantoni_Aura

 

Sat 25 May | 3pm – A performance by Rebecca Bellantoni
Free, no booking required

As part of And We’ll Always Be A Disco In the Glow of Love Ain Bailey has invited three artists, Elaine Mitchener, Hannah Catherine Jones and Rebecca Bellantoni to perform live within the space across three weekends in May, responding directly to the context of the exhibition. Each performance will take place within the exhibition setting and will last for approximately 20-minutes.

Rebecca Bellantoni is an artist born and living in London, of Caribbean descent. She works with  everyday occurrences and abstract them; with a focus on the lives and experiences of Black British people. Researching the smaller communities that have developed with the larger one. Viewing through the lens of pre and post colonial culture, metaphysics, comparative theology, religion and/or spirituality; the crossovers, the aesthetics of them. Simultaneously working with colour and its codes and objects and their ascribed cultural meanings to further question and describe. In terms of material and process, my practice is gleefully sprawling and encompasses video, performance, sound-text, photography, textiles, printmaking, drawing, sculpture, installation, writing and silversmithing.

And We’ll Always Be A Disco.. Hannah Catherine Jones performance

 

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Sun 19 May | 1pm – A performance by Hannah Catherine Jones
Free, no booking required

As part of And We’ll Always Be A Disco In the Glow of Love Ain Bailey has invited three artists, Elaine Mitchener, Hannah Catherine Jones and Rebecca Bellantoni to perform live within the space across three weekends in May, responding directly to the context of the exhibition. Each performance will take place within the exhibition setting and will last for approximately 20-minutes.

Hannah Catherine Jones (aka Foxy Moron) is a London-based artist, scholar, multi-instrumentalist, radio presenter and DJ (BBC Radio 3 – Late Junction, NTS – The Opera Show), composer, conductor and founder of Peckham Chamber Orchestra – a community project established in 2013. Jones is currently an AHRC DPhil scholar at Oxford University for which the ongoing body of work The Oweds will be presented as a series of live and recorded audio-visual episode-compositions using disruptive sound as a methodology of institutional decolonisation.

 

And We’ll Always Be A Disco.. Elaine Mitchener performance

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Sat 11 May | 3pm a performance by Elaine Mitchener
Free, no booking required

As part of And We’ll Always Be A Disco In the Glow of Love Ain Bailey has invited three artists, Elaine Mitchener, Hannah Catherine Jones and Rebecca Bellantoni to perform live within the space across three weekends in May, responding directly to the context of the exhibition. Each performance will take place within the exhibition setting and will last for approximately 20-minutes.

Born and raised in East London of Jamaican heritage, Elaine Mitchener is a contemporary vocal-movement artist and composer who has worked leading artists as: Moor Mother, Mark Padmore, The Otolith Group, Sonia Boyce, David Toop, Tansy Davies, Van Huynh Co, Irvine Arditti, Apartment House, London Sinfonietta, Steve Beresford, Christian Marclay, Phil Minton, George E. Lewis, Jason Yarde, Alexander Hawkins. Her UK/European performances include: Bimhuis, Café Oto, 56th Venice Biennale, ICA London, Southbank Centre, Maerzmusik/SAVVY Contemporary, London Contemporary Music Festival. She is co-founder of experimental jazz group Hawkins/Mitchener Quartet; founder of electro-acoustic trio The Rolling Calf and featured vocalist with ensemble Apartment House.  www.elainemitchener.com

Ain Bailey: And We’ll Always Be A Disco In the Glow of Love

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3 May–2 June 2019
Private View: Thursday 2 May 2019, 6.30–8.30PM
Open: Wed–Sun 12–6PM

And We’ll Always Be A Disco In the Glow of Love presents new work by London-based artist Ain Bailey. This will include a commissioned audio composition installed in Cubitt’s gallery within a spatial design by Mexico City based designer Clemence Seilles.

And We’ll Always Be A Disco In the Glow of Love takes Ain’s own sonic biography around loss and thinking through how to sonify grief as a starting point. It asks how we might create a collective dialogue around the personal experience of dealing with death and mourning.

This new work has been developed through conversations with eight close friends who have experienced a bereavement. Ain’s own contribution links these together to form nine distinct parts. These nine contributions centre on the sound(s) of that experience – an audio memory, a song, affect or emotion. The process of working with and from these recordings asks how we think about death sonically and produces a collective composition. The number nine is significant as it draws on the Caribbean funerary tradition of Nine-Nights, in which a wake takes place over several days.

Ain Bailey’s practice involves an exploration of sonic autobiographies, specifically how people use sound to create a sense of place. Central to this is the idea of ‘sonic biography’ is the personal constellation of sounds that form an individual identity and collaboration with performance, visual and sonic artists.

As part of the exhibition Ain Bailey has invited three musicians, Elaine Mitchener, Hannah Catherine Jones and Rebecca Bellantoni to perform live within the space across three weekends in May, responding directly to the context of the exhibition.

A new scenography for the gallery designed and installed by Clemence Seilles continues the collaboration between Cubitt and Seilles initiated at the start of the Structures That Cooperate programme that opened in October 2018. This new design and spatial arrangement is the second part of an evolving support structure to host, hold, make space for (and adapt to) the work of artists, collectives, commissions, film screenings, events and workshops.

 

Sat 11 May | 3pm a performance by Elaine Mitchener. Born and raised in East London of Jamaican heritage, Elaine Mitchener is a contemporary vocal-movement artist and composer who has worked leading artists as: Moor Mother, Mark Padmore, The Otolith Group, Sonia Boyce, David Toop, Tansy Davies, Van Huynh Co, Irvine Arditti, Apartment House, London Sinfonietta, Steve Beresford, Christian Marclay, Phil Minton, George E. Lewis, Jason Yarde, Alexander Hawkins. Her UK/European performances include: Bimhuis, Café Oto, 56th Venice Biennale, ICA London, Southbank Centre, Maerzmusik/SAVVY Contemporary, London Contemporary Music Festival. She is co-founder of experimental jazz group Hawkins/Mitchener Quartet; founder of electro-acoustic trio The Rolling Calf and featured vocalist with ensemble Apartment House.

Sun 19 May | 1pm – A performance by Hannah Catherine Jones. Hannah Catherine Jones (aka Foxy Moron) is a London-based artist, scholar, multi-instrumentalist, radio presenter and DJ (BBC Radio 3 – Late Junction, NTS – The Opera Show), composer, conductor and founder of Peckham Chamber Orchestra – a community project established in 2013. Jones is currently an AHRC DPhil scholar at Oxford University for which the ongoing body of work The Oweds will be presented as a series of live and recorded audio-visual episode-compositions using disruptive sound as a methodology of institutional decolonisation.

Sat 25 May | 3pm – A performance by Rebecca Bellantoni. is an artist born and living in London, of Caribbean descent. She works with everyday occurrences and abstract them; with a focus on the lives and experiences of Black British people. Researching the smaller communities that have developed with the larger one. Viewing through the lens of pre and post colonial culture, metaphysics, comparative theology, religion and/or spirituality; the crossovers, the aesthetics of them. Simultaneously working with colour and its codes and objects and their ascribed cultural meanings to further question and describe. In terms of material and process, my practice is gleefully sprawling and encompasses video, performance, sound-text, photography, textiles, printmaking, drawing, sculpture, installation, writing and silversmithing.

 

photo credit: Alice Marcelino

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Ongoing collaborations include working with Clemence Seilles on the scenography of the gallery space, The Voice of Domestic Workers in residence, Schooling & Culture at AMSI and research with W.A.G.E.

This is exhibition is supported by The Elephant TrustArts Council England and Outset Contemporary Art Fund.

The invitation to Clemence Seilles to design and develop an ongoing scenography for the gallery launching with Ain Bailey’s work has been generously supported by FLUXUS

  FLUXUSGREEN

Clemence Seilles

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On-going
Part 1: Oct 25–April 14 2019
Part 2: May 3–ongoing | launches 2 May 2019 6.30–8.30pm
Open during exhibition schedule

In Summer 2018 Cubitt started a conversation with Seilles to discuss a long-term artwork that would re-imagine and implement a new spatial configuration for the gallery space. The invitation to Seilles was to work with Cubitt across a new 15-month programme of exhibitions, events and commission that would depart from Cubitt’s structure as an artist-run cooperative. Seilles would take an active, evolving role of scenographer, designer and collaborator for the gallery space for the whole of the 2019 exhibition and events programme.

As a starting point for this proposed collaboration Cubitt invited Seilles to design and make a series of maquettes (room dividers, seating and work surfaces) for the first exhibition of the 2018/19 programme that opened in October 2018 – Structures That Cooperate. Seilles titled these starting maquettes Vermicelli, which comprised of curtains, stools and cardboard furniture to be manipulated like tools serving transformations and different uses of the space: a conference room, a workshop room, an exhibition room and projection room. These ‘tools’ were then used and adapted for 6-months in support of the public programme of events and workshops and also for the exhibitions Structures That Cooperate: Get Paid! and Lucy Clout: A Symptom

After the initial 6-month period for the first design a second iteration of the design will launch in May 2019 starting by hosting Ain Bailey’s exhibition And We’ll Always Be A Disco In the Glow of Love and then continuing to be used over the summer and subsequent public programme.

The invitation to Clemence Seilles to design and develop an ongoing scenography for the gallery has been generously supported by FLUXUS

bio:

Clemence Seilles is an artist and a designer, who produces applied and fantastic situations through objects, spaces, performances and autonomous free styling formations. A collaborative approach is characteristic of seilles’s protocol. Seilles commonly calls other artists and designers for their know-how and sensitivity. Collaborations include Andrea Crews, Adrien Missika, Theo demans, Joseph Marzolla, Melanie Bonajo, Krux Amsterdam, Egon Elliut and OXYDO eyewear. Seilles has actively taken part in founding the Dirty Art Department of Sandberg Instituut of Amsterdam and Stromboli associates design studio since 2016. She lives between France and Mexico City.

 

FLUXUSGREEN

Second Tongues Open Call!

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Let’s imagine the future of language; Not simply the languages that we hear most often and take up the most space today, nor those that experts predict will survive and those that will not, but every single possible future for all languages that have ever existed,  and for everyone to whom they belong, and those that come to belong.

An open call to take part in the research stages of Second Tongues, a speculative fiction art project by Toronto-based artist Serena Lee.

Second Tongues plays with ideas of language by imagining a future global nation-state that takes an absurdly omnicompetent approach to mandating second language acquisition as a basis for citizenship, exploring the relationship between power, belonging, and language.

Second Tongues will be developed through conversations with London-based language education organisations, migrant worker and newcomers communities, linguistic and social science researchers, and public audiences. This project is a polyphonic framework for critically engaging with experiences of nationhood, kinship, market-driven globalisation as they relate to histories and practices of language.

As part of the project, Serena would like to invite conversations with people who are interested in questions of how and why we learn languages. These conversations will develop to form a collaboratively authored presentation at Cubitt in June 2019.

If you would like to meet Serena for a research exchange conversation, there are bookable sessions of up 40 minutes each for individuals or groups of 2 or more on:

Tues 16 April 11am–3pm

Wed 17 April 5.30–8.30pm

Tues 23 April 5.30–8.30pm

Please contact info@cubittartists.org.uk to book or with any questions.

(please be advised spaces are limited and will be allocated on a first come first serve basis)

Paul Crook and JMC Hayes: new film made with EC1 Multicultural Woman’s Group March 2019

 

Artists Paul Crook and JMC Hayes, resident at St Luke’s Community Centre, created a short film portrait of the EC1 Multicultural Woman’s Group for the occasion of International Woman’s day. They facilitated a number of sessions where members of the community brought along objects of meaning that illustrated a part of their personal story. The resulting conversation and film captured a huge range of interesting subjects from China in the 70s to ritual burials in East Africa, and celebrates communal cultural activity at St Luke’s whether that’s attending dance classes or using the library.

 

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The film was launch as part of International Women’s Day Celebrations at St Luke’s Community Centre, and will be launched online soon.

 

Image credit: Paul Crook

Lucy Clout: A Symptom

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8 March – 14 April 2019.
Wed–Sun, 12–6pm.

A Symptom – a body of work by London-based artist Lucy Clout brings to Cubitt a set of propositions that in part offer up questions of self-organising, passive and active participation.

Sculptural and video pieces bring together research around the close readings of bodies in relation to medical diagnostic narratives, queer reproduction and pleasure. The creation of new knowledges, their distribution and the ability to access them is examined through the work via references to online communities where the internet is activated as the site of extreme publicness and privateness.

A Symptom talks to the possibility of [digital] screens for communication and community or screens as modes of privacy and concealed activity. Nurses, a 6 minute film, specifically references technology and online forums for sharing and organising in this instance around health and diagnosis and in relation to the inequitable availability of technology and kinship. The second film in the space Nurses 2, shown on a flatscreen monitor, reveals the construction of narrative, the filming and editing process with friends. Questions around self-organising, passive and active participation are addressed through a withheld subjectivity and with clouded transparency not to universalise what this can mean.

“The work comes out of a specific time spent in an attic flat on the Scottish border. A sickness of now, a cure of now, a pleasure of now too – understood via bodily image production, projections and interpretations.

These sets of work are not an argument but a set of stories and tones – the sociopathic CEO leveraging the single drop of blood as oracle, a website on which orgasm sounds are shared and discussed, the monitoring of cervical and ocular mucous, a body coded as infertile or aroused.

I imagine ‘Nurses 2’ as an obscure set of footnotes, or silent backing singers. Tone is created in the filtering of screens and cameras. Both bluntness and blur are used in a performance of pleasure against interpretation.” – Lucy Clout

The invitation to Lucy Clout from Cubitt’s Curatorial Fellow Louise Shelley also makes transparent the position of friendship, drawing on a shared history of exchange, support, trust and positions developed in parallel and in difference. Whilst not a subject of the work, this is a structure inherent in its display at Cubitt.

A text by writer Lizzie Homersham is also made available which builds on a conversation and an essay published as part of Solvent Magazine an exhibition by Lucy as part of Berwick Film & Media Arts Festival 2018.

In October 2018 Cubitt’s public programme started organising under the title Structures That Cooperate, an ongoing programme that talks to Cubitt’s context as an artist-run co-operative. Events, workshops and artworks have so far shown approaches to organising, economies and collective formats, imaginaries and realities. A Symptom is the first of two spring exhibitions that work to extend and complicate these starting enquiries through solo authored presentations that address possibilities for collective mobilisation from personal positions and politics.

The work presented builds on work made during a six-month residency Lucy undertook with Berwick Visual Arts and Berwick Film & Media Arts Festival in 2018.

—-

Lucy Clout is a London based artist whose videos use technology and pop culture to examine loneliness, intimacy and kinship. The works produce and reproduce minor (disposable or insignificant) speech to examine embodiment, longing and historically gendered performance. Recent projects include forthcoming new work for flatness.eu (2019). In 2015 she was awarded the Jerwood/Film and Video Umbrella award. Recent exhibitions include Solvent Magazine, The Gymnasium, Berwick as part of Berwick Film & Media Arts Festival (2018), Jerwood Space, London, CCA, Glasgow (2015) and Limoncello, London (2016). Recent screenings include Raven Row, Tate Britain and Anthology Film Archives, New York (all 2017).  

This exhibition is supported by Arts Council England and Outset Contemporary Art Fund.

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Lucy Clout: A Symptom, installation view, Cubitt Gallery, 2019. Photography by Mark Blower, courtesy of Cubitt Artists.

 

Lucy Clout: A Symptom

nurses test

8 March – 14 April 2019

Wed–Sun, 12–6pm

A Symptom – a body of work by London-based artist Lucy Clout brings to Cubitt a set of propositions that in part offer up questions of self-organising, passive and active participation.

Sculptural and video pieces bring together research around the close readings of bodies in relation to medical diagnostic narratives, queer reproduction and pleasure. The creation of new knowledges, their distribution and the ability to access them is examined through the work via references to online communities where the internet is activated as the site of extreme publicness and privateness.

A Symptom talks to the possibility of [digital] screens for communication and community or screens as modes of privacy and concealed activity. Nurses, a 6 minute film, specifically references technology and online forums for sharing and organising in this instance around health and diagnosis and in relation to the inequitable availability of technology and kinship. The second film in the space Nurses 2, shown on a flatscreen monitor, reveals the construction of narrative, the filming and editing process with friends. Questions around self-organising, passive and active participation are addressed through a withheld subjectivity and with clouded transparency not to universalise what this can mean.

“The work comes out of a specific time spent in an attic flat on the Scottish border. A sickness of now, a cure of now, a pleasure of now too – understood via bodily image production, projections and interpretations.

These sets of work are not an argument but a set of stories and tones – the sociopathic CEO leveraging the single drop of blood as oracle, a website on which orgasm sounds are shared and discussed, the monitoring of cervical and ocular mucous, a body coded as infertile or aroused.

I imagine ‘Nurses 2’ as an obscure set of footnotes, or silent backing singers. Tone is created in the filtering of screens and cameras. Both bluntness and blur are used in a performance of pleasure against interpretation.” – Lucy Clout

The invitation to Lucy Clout from Cubitt’s Curatorial Fellow Louise Shelley also makes transparent the position of friendship, drawing on a shared history of exchange, support, trust and positions developed in parallel and in difference. Whilst not a subject of the work, this is a structure inherent in its display at Cubitt.

A text by writer Lizzie Homersham is also made available which builds on a conversation and an essay published as part of Solvent Magazine an exhibition by Lucy as part of Berwick Film & Media Arts Festival 2018.

In October 2018 Cubitt’s public programme started organising under the title Structures That Cooperate, an ongoing programme that talks to Cubitt’s context as an artist-run co-operative. Events, workshops and artworks have so far shown approaches to organising, economies and collective formats, imaginaries and realities. A Symptom is the first of two spring exhibitions that work to extend and complicate these starting enquiries through solo authored presentations that address possibilities for collective mobilisation from personal positions and politics.

The work presented builds on work made during a six-month residency Lucy undertook with Berwick Visual Arts and Berwick Film & Media Arts Festival in 2018.

—-

Lucy Clout is a London based artist whose videos use technology and pop culture to examine loneliness, intimacy and kinship. The works produce and reproduce minor (disposable or insignificant) speech to examine embodiment, longing and historically gendered performance. Recent projects include forthcoming new work for flatness.eu (2019). In 2015 she was awarded the Jerwood/Film and Video Umbrella award. Recent exhibitions include Solvent Magazine, The Gymnasium, Berwick as part of Berwick Film & Media Arts Festival (2018), Jerwood Space, London, CCA, Glasgow (2015) and Limoncello, London (2016). Recent screenings include Raven Row, Tate Britain and Anthology Film Archives, New York (all 2017).  

This exhibition is supported by Arts Council England and Outset Contemporary Art Fund.

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Lucy Clout: A Symptom, installation view, Cubitt Gallery, 2019. Photography by Mark Blower, courtesy of Cubitt Artists.

Sadie Edginton reports on the recent No Shortlist workshop

Sadie Edginton has written a piece in response to taking part in Joshua Sofaer’s No Shortlist workshop. Sadie and Joshua both have studios at  73 Mildmay Street Extra Care setting, as part of a partnership project with Cubitt and Notting Hill Genesis.

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Image credit: Sadie Edginton

Here is an excerpt:

After introductions, Joshua explained the premise of ‘No Shortlists’. He put the artists’ names into a bowl and pulled them out one by one, matching us to the four institutions. We were reminded that ‘every artist had been nominated by someone else in the room’. It was like a secret Santa, each institution bringing an artist and starting a project with a different artist. I was matched with Cara Courage from Tate Exchange. Next we were due to go off for a chat, present our work for 20 minutes and ‘workshop together towards the goal of creating a new piece that will go on to be fully commissioned.’

Cara and I went up to my studio on the second floor of the care home where we sat and talked for an hour and a half at my desk. The conversation flowed easily and we seemed to share an appreciation of the issues surrounding collaborative practices. Here I was speaking to someone who was interested in my work, rather than critically examining it and that was already a validating experience.

To read more go to:

https://www.axisweb.org/models-of-validation/content/social-works/2018/social-works-artist-led-workshop-no-shortlists-blog/

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Image credit: Sadie Edginton

Links:

Artist Participants
Amy Pennington amypennington.co.uk
Elsa James elsajames.com
Sadie Edginton sadieedginton.tumblr.com
Juan delGado cargocollective.com/JuandelGado/Works

Organisation Participants
Cara Courage, Tate Exchange www.tate.org.uk/visit/tate-modern/tate-exchange
Dimity Nicholls, Cubitt Education cubittartists.org.uk/education/
Elena Gifford, Festival of Making festivalofmaking.co.uk
Emily Gee, Heart of Glass www.heartofglass.org.uk

Facilitator
Joshua Sofaer www.joshuasofaer.com

 

Cooperative Lunch #2 hosted by Cooperativas de Alimentos

VECTEEZY

 

Cooperative Lunch #2 hosted by Cooperativas de Alimentos

Sunday 24 Feb | 1–3pm  

Free, places limited booking advisable <here>

Cooperativas de Alimentos will be the hosts for Cooperative Lunch #2

Cooperativa de Alimentros is a collective formed by Ismail Ali- Project Alchemy and Jakeline Londono – Artist and Designer, following their passion for food, sharing and telling stories through food.

 Cooperativa de Alimentos presents a menu that reimagines tradition and pays homage to street food and ancestral recipes.

The menu will be composed of a kind of utilitarian food that is present in many cultures. Little parcels of dough and corn, that have provided communities with high nutritional values, functionality and hearty taste.

From empanadas found in most streets in south America and the Philippines, to the Cornish pasty that provided miners with tasty and sustaining meals while they worked. To the calzone or walk around pizza, traditionally sold by street vendors in Naples, these parcels of deliciousness have kept communities going for over 300 years.

Drinks will be include Vicenta’s simple, yet beautiful & seductive purple corn magic nectar, national drink from Peru – ‘Chicha Murada’ alongside Ismail’s offering to grind, brew, plunge down on big pot of hot, oily black golden liquid, derived from a special earthy bean. Fruited on the coffee cherry tree, selected from the Latin region.

In the spirit of communal feast, guests are invited to eat with their hands, immersing themselves in a surprising culinary and cultural journey.

Expect: empanadas, wontons, calzoni, samosas, Cornish pastries, curry puffs, in all shapes and sizes.

Cooperative Lunches is a regular event series at Cubitt, an event around food, community, sharing space and knowledge. The first Cooperative Lunch in October 2018 was hosted by The Voice of Domestic Workers, a migrant domestic worker union in residence at Cubitt until December 2019.

Coop Fund Workshop

bucket

Saturday 16 Feb 209 | 3–5pm – COOP Fund Workshop

Free, places limited book <here>

Coop Fund is an experimental cooperative funding platform that accumulates financial resources through member contributions, and redistributes small funds to members using a cooperative decision making process.

This introductory workshop to their work and processes forms ongoing research and conversations Cubitt is engaged with through the 2018/19 programme into how to to think through resource distribution and economics in arts organisations; particularly looking at how artist-led cooperative models can develop autonomy and resistance.

 

The purpose of Coop Fund is to:

  1. Generate resources and discussion with individuals and/or collectives who want to formalise their working practices.
  2. Recognise members have individual needs and that these needs affect one’s ability to participate in collective work.
  3. Support proposals that struggle to get support elsewhere, either because it’s a project or group that is not formally constituted, because of the political content of the proposal, or because the protocols of the funding process are exclusionary.
  4. Resist the current forms of investor-owned, corporate, for-profit business models that dominate most areas of life, and bring into question the non-profit model and its over-reliance on wealthy elites.
  5. Address inequitable wealth distribution and the causes of injustice and inequality in our community through solidarity and discussion.
  6. Work in the field of cultural production. We don’t see this field as exceptional, or exempt from the need to develop ideas for structural change in regards to wealth distribution and democratic work practices. In fact, we know that this field is highly unregulated, exploitative and exclusionary at all levels.
  7. Show solidarity with historical and contemporary anticapitalist struggles, and acknowledge how these struggles have also tried to defend against the violence of white supremacy, heterosexism, ableism, gender binaries and environmental destruction.

https://coopfund.info/

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