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Paul Crook and JMC Hayes: new film made with EC1 Multicultural Woman’s Group March 2019

 

Artists Paul Crook and JMC Hayes, resident at St Luke’s Community Centre, created a short film portrait of the EC1 Multicultural Woman’s Group for the occasion of International Woman’s day. They facilitated a number of sessions where members of the community brought along objects of meaning that illustrated a part of their personal story. The resulting conversation and film captured a huge range of interesting subjects from China in the 70s to ritual burials in East Africa, and celebrates communal cultural activity at St Luke’s whether that’s attending dance classes or using the library.

 

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The film was launch as part of International Women’s Day Celebrations at St Luke’s Community Centre, and will be launched online soon.

 

Image credit: Paul Crook

Lucy Clout: A Symptom

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8 March – 14 April 2019.
Wed–Sun, 12–6pm.

A Symptom – a body of work by London-based artist Lucy Clout brings to Cubitt a set of propositions that in part offer up questions of self-organising, passive and active participation.

Sculptural and video pieces bring together research around the close readings of bodies in relation to medical diagnostic narratives, queer reproduction and pleasure. The creation of new knowledges, their distribution and the ability to access them is examined through the work via references to online communities where the internet is activated as the site of extreme publicness and privateness.

A Symptom talks to the possibility of [digital] screens for communication and community or screens as modes of privacy and concealed activity.  Nurses a 10 minute film specifically references technology and online forums for sharing and organising in this instance around health and diagnosis and in relation to the inequitable availability of technology and kinship.

The invitation to Lucy Clout from Cubitt’s Curatorial Fellow Louise Shelley also makes transparent the position of friendship, drawing on a shared history of exchange, support, trust and positions developed in parallel and in difference. Whilst not a subject of the work, this is a structure inherent in its display at Cubitt.

In October 2018 Cubitt’s public programme started organising under the title Structures That Cooperate, an ongoing programme that talks to Cubitt’s context as an artist-run co-operative. Events, workshops and artworks have so far shown approaches to organising, economies and collective formats, imaginaries and realities.

A Symptom is the first of two spring exhibitions that work to extend and complicate these starting enquiries through solo authored presentations that address possibilities for collective mobilisation from personal positions and politics.

The work presented builds on work made during a six-month residency Lucy undertook with Berwick Visual Arts and Berwick Film & Media Arts Festival in 2018.

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Lucy Clout is a London based artist whose videos use technology and pop culture to examine loneliness, intimacy and kinship. The works produce and reproduce minor (disposable or insignificant) speech to examine embodiment, longing and historically gendered performance. Recent projects include forthcoming new work for flatness.eu (2019). In 2015 she was awarded the Jerwood/Film and Video Umbrella award. Recent exhibitions include Solvent Magazine, The Gymnasium, Berwick as part of Berwick Film & Media Arts Festival (2018), Jerwood Space, London, CCA, Glasgow (2015) and Limoncello, London (2016). Recent screenings include Raven Row, Tate Britain and Anthology Film Archives, New York (all 2017).  

This exhibition is supported by Arts Council England and Outset Contemporary Art Fund.

 

Lucy Clout: A Symptom

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Private View 7 March 6.30–8.30pm

8 March – 14 April 2019
Wed–Sun, 12–6pm

 

A Symptom – a body of work by London-based artist Lucy Clout brings to Cubitt a set of propositions that in part offer up questions of self-organising, passive and active participation. Sculptural and video pieces bring together research around the close readings of bodies in relation to medical diagnostic narratives, queer reproduction and pleasure. The creation of new knowledges, their distribution and the ability to access them is examined through the work via references to online communities where the internet is activated as the site of extreme publicness and privateness.

A Symptom talks to the possibility of [digital] screens for communication and community or screens as modes of privacy and concealed activity.  Nurses a 10 minute film specifically references technology and online forums for sharing and organising in this instance around health and diagnosis and in relation to the inequitable availability of technology and kinship.

The invitation to Lucy Clout from Cubitt’s Curatorial Fellow Louise Shelley also makes transparent the position of friendship, drawing on a shared history of exchange, support, trust and positions developed in parallel and in difference. Whilst not a subject of the work, this is a structure inherent in its display at Cubitt.

In October 2018 Cubitt’s public programme started organising under the title Structures That Cooperate, an ongoing programme that talks to Cubitt’s context as an artist-run co-operative. Events, workshops and artworks have so far shown approaches to organising, economies and collective formats, imaginaries and realities.

A Symptom is the first of two spring exhibitions that work to extend and complicate these starting enquiries through solo authored presentations that address possibilities for collective mobilisation from personal positions and politics.

The work presented builds on work made during a six-month residency Lucy undertook with Berwick Visual Arts and Berwick Film & Media Arts Festival in 2018.

—-

Lucy Clout is a London based artist whose videos use technology and pop culture to examine loneliness, intimacy and kinship. The works produce and reproduce minor (disposable or insignificant) speech to examine embodiment, longing and historically gendered performance. Recent projects include forthcoming new work for flatness.eu (2019). In 2015 she was awarded the Jerwood/Film and Video Umbrella award. Recent exhibitions include Solvent Magazine, The Gymnasium, Berwick as part of Berwick Film & Media Arts Festival (2018), Jerwood Space, London, CCA, Glasgow (2015) and Limoncello, London (2016). Recent screenings include Raven Row, Tate Britain and Anthology Film Archives, New York (all 2017).  

This exhibition is supported by Arts Council England and Outset Contemporary Art Fund.

Sadie Edginton reports on the recent No Shortlist workshop

Sadie Edginton has written a piece in response to taking part in Joshua Sofaer’s No Shortlist workshop. Sadie and Joshua both have studios at  73 Mildmay Street Extra Care setting, as part of a partnership project with Cubitt and Notting Hill Genesis.

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Image credit: Sadie Edginton

Here is an excerpt:

After introductions, Joshua explained the premise of ‘No Shortlists’. He put the artists’ names into a bowl and pulled them out one by one, matching us to the four institutions. We were reminded that ‘every artist had been nominated by someone else in the room’. It was like a secret Santa, each institution bringing an artist and starting a project with a different artist. I was matched with Cara Courage from Tate Exchange. Next we were due to go off for a chat, present our work for 20 minutes and ‘workshop together towards the goal of creating a new piece that will go on to be fully commissioned.’

Cara and I went up to my studio on the second floor of the care home where we sat and talked for an hour and a half at my desk. The conversation flowed easily and we seemed to share an appreciation of the issues surrounding collaborative practices. Here I was speaking to someone who was interested in my work, rather than critically examining it and that was already a validating experience.

To read more go to:

https://www.axisweb.org/models-of-validation/content/social-works/2018/social-works-artist-led-workshop-no-shortlists-blog/

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Image credit: Sadie Edginton

Links:

Artist Participants
Amy Pennington amypennington.co.uk
Elsa James elsajames.com
Sadie Edginton sadieedginton.tumblr.com
Juan delGado cargocollective.com/JuandelGado/Works

Organisation Participants
Cara Courage, Tate Exchange www.tate.org.uk/visit/tate-modern/tate-exchange
Dimity Nicholls, Cubitt Education cubittartists.org.uk/education/
Elena Gifford, Festival of Making festivalofmaking.co.uk
Emily Gee, Heart of Glass www.heartofglass.org.uk

Facilitator
Joshua Sofaer www.joshuasofaer.com

 

Cooperative Lunch #2 hosted by Cooperativas de Alimentos

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Cooperative Lunch #2 hosted by Cooperativas de Alimentos

Sunday 24 Feb | 1–3pm  

Free, places limited booking advisable <here>

Cooperativas de Alimentos will be the hosts for Cooperative Lunch #2

Cooperativa de Alimentros is a collective formed by Ismail Ali- Project Alchemy and Jakeline Londono – Artist and Designer, following their passion for food, sharing and telling stories through food.

 Cooperativa de Alimentos presents a menu that reimagines tradition and pays homage to street food and ancestral recipes.

The menu will be composed of a kind of utilitarian food that is present in many cultures. Little parcels of dough and corn, that have provided communities with high nutritional values, functionality and hearty taste.

From empanadas found in most streets in south America and the Philippines, to the Cornish pasty that provided miners with tasty and sustaining meals while they worked. To the calzone or walk around pizza, traditionally sold by street vendors in Naples, these parcels of deliciousness have kept communities going for over 300 years.

Drinks will be include Vicenta’s simple, yet beautiful & seductive purple corn magic nectar, national drink from Peru – ‘Chicha Murada’ alongside Ismail’s offering to grind, brew, plunge down on big pot of hot, oily black golden liquid, derived from a special earthy bean. Fruited on the coffee cherry tree, selected from the Latin region.

In the spirit of communal feast, guests are invited to eat with their hands, immersing themselves in a surprising culinary and cultural journey.

Expect: empanadas, wontons, calzoni, samosas, Cornish pastries, curry puffs, in all shapes and sizes.

Cooperative Lunches is a regular event series at Cubitt, an event around food, community, sharing space and knowledge. The first Cooperative Lunch in October 2018 was hosted by The Voice of Domestic Workers, a migrant domestic worker union in residence at Cubitt until December 2019.

Coop Fund Workshop

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Saturday 16 Feb 209 | 3–5pm – COOP Fund Workshop

Free, places limited book <here>

Coop Fund is an experimental cooperative funding platform that accumulates financial resources through member contributions, and redistributes small funds to members using a cooperative decision making process.

This introductory workshop to their work and processes forms ongoing research and conversations Cubitt is engaged with through the 2018/19 programme into how to to think through resource distribution and economics in arts organisations; particularly looking at how artist-led cooperative models can develop autonomy and resistance.

 

The purpose of Coop Fund is to:

  1. Generate resources and discussion with individuals and/or collectives who want to formalise their working practices.
  2. Recognise members have individual needs and that these needs affect one’s ability to participate in collective work.
  3. Support proposals that struggle to get support elsewhere, either because it’s a project or group that is not formally constituted, because of the political content of the proposal, or because the protocols of the funding process are exclusionary.
  4. Resist the current forms of investor-owned, corporate, for-profit business models that dominate most areas of life, and bring into question the non-profit model and its over-reliance on wealthy elites.
  5. Address inequitable wealth distribution and the causes of injustice and inequality in our community through solidarity and discussion.
  6. Work in the field of cultural production. We don’t see this field as exceptional, or exempt from the need to develop ideas for structural change in regards to wealth distribution and democratic work practices. In fact, we know that this field is highly unregulated, exploitative and exclusionary at all levels.
  7. Show solidarity with historical and contemporary anticapitalist struggles, and acknowledge how these struggles have also tried to defend against the violence of white supremacy, heterosexism, ableism, gender binaries and environmental destruction.

https://coopfund.info/

CCCO license > download

 

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>click here to download the CCCO license<

 

Cultural Capital Cooperative Object (CCCO) is an artist co-operative formed in 2016. Its current member base is: Nikita Gale, Sidsel Meineche Hansen, Nour Mobarak, Blaine O’Neill, Patrick Staff. Their work addresses how the cooperative model can function for a diversity and pluralism of mutual ownership. CCC works to challenge assumptions of individual ownership, pervasive in the art field and broader political economy.

The cooperative’s video, CCCO#2 is a remake of Shigeru Izumiya’s horror film Death Powder (1986), reconsidering the body-horror aesthetics and post- cyberpunk narrative of the original film alongside images from contemporary culture. It was produced and is exhibited under a set of conditions determined by the cooperative, and was originally presented at LAXART in 2016, two days before the US presidential election.

In 2017-2018, CCCO sought legal counsel to assist in drafting a formal legal identity and a contract for the sale and transfer of their work. The artists worked with lawyer Daniel McClean in order to conceptualise a legal mechanism whereby the cooperative members could retain ownership of their work after its sale and transfer.

Starting January 2019 the license has been used by the co-operative to establish a licensing agreement with Cubitt for a period of 12–months. The signed agreement will be presented in the gallery for the duration of the Get Paid! exhibition. Additionally a template format of the CCCO license is available to download from the link above throughout the Structures That Cooperate 12–month programme. In this form the license becomes a usable template for other cooperatives to form, create and disseminate work within a structure of mutual ownership.

Structures that Cooperate: Get Paid!

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Structures that Cooperate: Get Paid!

Cultural Capital Cooperative Object #2 (CCCO#2) produced by artists Nikita Gale, Candice Lin, Sidsel Meineche Hansen, Nour Mobarak, Blaine O’Neill, and Patrick Staff, Black Obsidian Sound System (B.O.S.S) and Ceramics Studio Co-op and events with COOP Fund and Cooperative Lunch #2 hosted by Cooperativas de Alimentos

Preview 17 January 2019, 6.30–8.30pm. All welcome to attend.

18 January to 24 February 2019
Wed–Sun, 12–6pm

Saturday Socials commission

Ings (Holding, Shaking, Gazing, Net-Working) & An Edible Portion of Truth are two artworks created in parallel by Lucy Steggals & Ania Bas in collaboration with Islington residents.

Structures That Cooperate: Get Paid!

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Click through to project site

 

Structures That Cooperate: Get Paid!

Private View: Thurs 17 Jan 2019
6.30–8.30pm

Cultural Capital Cooperative Object #2 (CCCO#2) produced by artists Nikita Gale, Candice Lin, Sidsel Meineche Hansen, Nour Mobarak, Blaine O’Neill, and Patrick Staff, Black Obsidian Sound System (B.O.S.S) and Ceramics Studio Co-op and events with COOP Fund and Cooperative Lunch #2 hosted by Cooperativas de Alimentos

Open: 18 Jan–24 Feb 2019, Wed–Sun, 12–6pm

 

Structures That Cooperate reopens for 2019 with a second configuration of the space designed by Mexico City-based artist Clemence Seilles. It will host newly installed work in the gallery and an ongoing public programme under the title Get Paid!

Structures That Cooperate: Get Paid! presents artworks, events and projects operating with politicised models of economy and organisation. These include Cultural Capital Cooperative Object #2 (CCCO#2) a cooperatively produced and owned film by artists Nikita Gale, Candice Lin, Sidsel Meineche Hansen, Nour Mobarak, Blaine O’Neill, and Patrick Staff amplified by the Black Obsidian Sound System (B.O.S.S) installed alongside works from the Ceramics Studio Co-op, London.

In continuation of a format established in October, where Cubitt’s gallery is used for an extended schedule of events, commissions, research and exhibitions, Get Paid! will present work across several formats and timeframes

For a 12-month period Cubitt will be licensing the CCCO#2 film as a process of dialogue and support of the Cultural Capital Cooperative group. CCCO#2 will be installed in the gallery for Get Paid! inviting Black Obsidian Sound System to amplify the sound of the film for the opening night. Black Obsidian Sound System is a collectively made and owned sound system established in the summer of 2018 with the intention of bringing together a community of queer, trans and non binary people of colour involved in art, sound and radical activism.

After CCCO#2’s public installation in the gallery, the film will be available to view at Cubitt by appointment until December 2019, alongside a template of the CCC license agreement. This agreement will be made available as a free download from the Cubitt website as a resource for others, to be adapted and used in support of future cooperative art production.

Into this context, Get Paid! invites another cooperative, Ceramics Studio Co-op an artist-run worker co-operative in south London. Ceramics Studio Co-op will present a selection of works for sale by its members and, as part of a longer term conversation, are working with The Voice of Domestic Workers towards the production of a new collaborative ceramic work for sale later in 2019. Ceramics Studio Co-op members who will be showing work in the gallery include: Fredrik Andersson, Anna Baskakova, Tatiana Baskakova, Lenka Kalafutová, Sandra Lane, Tristan Lathey, Sarah Odedina, Holly Stevenson.

Events:
Sat 16 Feb | 3–5pm – COOP Fund. A workshop with COOP Fund New York. An experimental cooperative funding platform that accumulates financial resources through member contributions, and redistributes small funds to members using a cooperative decision making process.

Sun 24 Feb | 1–3pm – Cooperative Lunch #2 w/ Cooperativas de Alimentos. Cooperativas de Alimentos will be the hosts for Cooperative Lunch #2 – a newly formed community food collective. Cooperative Lunches is a regular event series at Cubitt, an event around food, community, sharing space and knowledge. The first Cooperative Lunch in October 2018 was hosted by The Voice of Domestic Workers, a migrant domestic worker union in residence at Cubitt until December 2019.

Ongoing collaborations include working with Clemence Seilles on the scenography of the gallery space, The Voice of Domestic Workers in residence, Schooling & Culture at AMSI and research with W.A.G.E.

———-

Structures that Cooperate is a programme of projects that began October 2018 that talk to Cubitt’s context as an artist-run co-operative. It is a call to question default approaches to programming a gallery space, looking instead to collective formats, imaginaries and realities.

Projects and artists who will feature in the 2019 programme include: Ain Bailey, Lucy Clout, Deborah Findlater, Aya Haidar with The Voice of Domestic Workers and Women for Refugee Women, Adelita Husni-Bey, Schooling & Culture with Arts and Media School Islington, Serena Lee, W.A.G.E, Cubitt’s Education programme and more to be announced.

This exhibition is supported by Arts Council England and Outset Contemporary Art Fund.

 

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Structures That Cooperate: Get Paid!  Cultural Capital Cooperative Object #2, Black Obsidian Sound System and Ceramics Studio Co-op, installation view, Cubitt Gallery, 2019. Photography by Mark Blower, courtesy of Cubitt Artists.

 

Saturday Socials commission

Ings (Holding, Shaking, Gazing, Net-Working) & An Edible Portion of Truth are two artworks created in parallel by Lucy Steggals & Ania Bas in collaboration with Islington residents.

Ings (Holding, Shaking, Gazing, Net-Working) is a series of relational objects that you are invited to make yourself using everyday materials. These can then be used to create new ways of experiencing your home environment.

To download instructions please click:

  1. Holding
  2. Shaking
  3. Gazing
  4. Net-Working

An Edible Portion of Truth is an audio piece composed of six chapters of lively narratives exploring childhood, sexuality, the hardships of adulthood and troubles of getting old. To listen to this audio please click through to:

SoundCloud

Both works exist separately but have a number crossovers; works explore sensuality and the importance of human contact, invite the audience to make whilst listening and explore interconnections between a busy hand and an engaged ear.

Ings is a series of four relational objects designed in collaboration with Lucy Steggals and Saturday Socials a creative group who meet monthly at Cubitt. Contributors include David Milner, Peter Lanes, Maria Trofan, Maria D’Inverno, Maria Luisa Castelo, Kathy Cobb, Eileen Jacob, Ruth Pridham, Selma Atasoy, Mike Turney, Melanie Longmore, Anne Kozlowski-Hunt and Kusum Gohil.

An Edible Portion of Truth is an audio work by  Ania Bas developed through conversations with users of Islington’s Home Library Service. It consists of stories told by Boots Bantock, Douglas Dabb, Adeline Defalco, Valentina Dunmow, Leslie Kent, June Pile, Patricia Grace Slark and Phil Wildman.

Please note that in some of the recordings explicit language is used. Recordings were made in an informal, familiar setting amongst all adult friends. The conversations were not scripted but followed narrative prompts. This work aims to share some of the joy of those interactions and bring the participants’ voices to a wider audience.

These projects are part of the Saturday Socials programme, a partnership project with Cubitt, All Change and North London Cares, funded by Islington Giving and Arts Council England. The Saturday Socials programme aims to create more social connections between older Islington residents, and in 2017 Cubitt developed a new partnership with Islington’s Home Library Service to develop new ways to do this.

The works on this page were commissioned by Cubitt as part of their Going Places programme funded through Arts Council England’s Celebrating Age.

With thanks to:

Charlene Sandy, Outreach Coordinator, Cubitt

Kim Obeney, Community Access Senior Librarian, Islington Libraries

Tony Brown, Stock and Reader Development Manager, Islington Libraries

Esther Collins, Programme Manager: Adults and Community, Cubitt

All the staff and volunteers at: Ash Court Sheltered Housing

Duval House Sheltered Housing and Highbury New Park Day Centre

 

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Community Studio available at AMSI. Deadline Wednesday 5th December 2018

Cubitt Education is seeking an artist to take residence from mid-January 2019 in a community studio based at Arts and Media School Islington (AMSI), a secondary school in north Islington with excellent links across the local community.  License fees are £150pcm, all bills (and wifi) inclusive. Studio sizes is approx. 215sq. Taking on a studio at AMSI will involve artists donating 2 hours per month of their time for creative projects which benefit and involve the members of the school community. More details of the project are here.

IMG_1558AMSI STUDIO DIMENSIONS (as built)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We are searching for an artist who:
– has an inspiring and engaging practice and diverse range of practical skills which could be applied to a wide variety of workshops or projects
– is experienced in arts education
– is interested in working within a formal education setting, with the benefits and challenges that entails
– has or is willing to obtain an Enhanced DBS certificate issued within the last 3 years. AMSI will cover the cost of this process
– is able to take occupancy as close as possible to 13th January 2019

We are interested in hearing from individual artists, emerging artists and artist collectives

The deadline for this opportunity has now passed

For more information, please contact Lydia Ashman, Programme Manager: Schools & Young People, on lydia@cubittartists.org.uk (Working days: Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fridays)

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